top of page

Preventing Resource Guarding

Guest Blog by Jennifer Caves Pendleton, M.Psy, CGC, Canine-Human Educator for REAL Animal Sanctuary and Behavioral Solutions

Resource Guarding is a common issue we counsel on. We already have slides for active resource guarding so please remember this is prevention minded. Resource guarding has an adaptive purpose, serves a function and is actually a normal dog behavior. Many people experience their dogs work out a Resource Guarding conflict when one has a toy and is possessing it and one dog lets the other dog know with a growl or a body posture not to take it. We accept that level of guarding. And we even guard our valuables too! It tends to become an issue when the dog guards with no threat signature (no warning signs), has poor bite inhibition and/or is guarding multiple parts of the home, family, food and items. So let's start helping people prevent resource guarding from surfacing to an unhealthy level!




Meet the Behaviorist, Jennifer Caves, M.Psy, CGC:

"Welcome dog lovers and all dogs! I am the founder and Canine-Human Educator for REAL Animal Sanctuary and Behavioral Solutions. We consider our work to be rooted in science and driven by ethics. Our passion meets purpose mission is unique in that we empower and educate people with a lifelong skill set to help any dog they share their life with currently or in the future. Dogs are incredibly resilient and intelligent and when the humans in their life know the how, why and successful implementation of behavioral principles- our dogs become happy, healthy and healed. I have my Masters in Psychology and Canine Good Citizen Certification through the AKC. I have literally been rescuing animals since I was 16 years old with 15 years of behavioral experience. I consider it a privilege to work with you and your dog!"


Contact Jennifer by visiting www.realsanctuary.net


Thank you for supporting Dallas Dog. Our mission is to create a safer place for animals by rescuing and rehabilitating those who are neglected, unwanted and abused across Texas or displaced by natural disasters nearby and finding them a permanent home. You can visit our website at www.dallasdogrrr.org to follow our amazing journey.



26 views0 comments

Recent Posts