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PARTNERSHIPS

GoodPup For All
Every Dog - Every Adopter

Dallas Dog and Good Pup have partnered up to help adopters make that special connection with their newly adopted pup! We want to help ease the transition when bringing your new pup into - their new home. .  We want to help you build a stronger bond with your pup via humane, reward based training methods. We have partnered with Good Pup by purchasing 40 four week training sessions to give to our adopters.  We want to set you up for success and help you build better relationships through better training. 

  • How do I adopt a pet?
    First, go to our website at www.dallasdogrrr.org and check out our many adoptable animals. Then, complete and submit your application and our adoption team will contact you within 48 hours.
  • How long does the adoption process take?
    Once your application is submitted, it is assigned to a processor, they are all volunteers so please be patient. You should hear from someone within 24 hours. Please see our website under adoption to see the whole application process. If you do not hear back from someone within 48 hours, please contact adopt@dallasdogrrr.org Once your application is approved, you will proceed to the next step of a meet and greet and that timeline can vary upon availability.
  • What kind of dogs/cats do you have?
    We usually have about 200-250 foster animals in our rescue at a time that include puppies, kittens, teenage animals, as well as adults and seniors. We have all sizes and ages. We have a wide selection of companions for you to choose from! We also specialize in hospice and medicals that under the right conditions, will consider for adoption. If you are looking for a specific type of pet, please email adopt@dallasdogrrr.org for help with matchmaking you with the perfect pet for your family!
  • I'm looking for a purebred dog/cat. Do you have any?
    We receive purebred dogs, cats, puppies and kittens to our rescue. These animals are usually adopted quickly. Maybe try fostering or emailing adopt@dallasdogrrr.org to help you identify what we currently have in our rescue presently.
  • Does the Dallas DogRRR complete medical and behavioral testing on every animal in its care?
    Dallas DogRRR dogs are all placed in foster care. We complete a full medical evaluation and we do gather behavior information on each animal in our care. The organization fully discloses all known medical and/or behavioral conditions, including any incidents of biting or violent behavior towards a human, to all adopters and fosters. Despite the rigorous testing our veterinary and behavioral professionals conduct throughout every animal’s stay in our foster/boarding facility, other new and/or unknown medical and/or behavioral conditions may manifest in any animal at any time. By adopting or fostering an animal from the Dallas DogRRR, adopters and fosters acknowledge at the time of adoption or fostering that they may receive an animal with an undetected medical and/or behavioral condition and/or that a new medical and/or behavioral condition may appear at any time in the future. Any pet adopted from DAllas DogRRR can be returned to us at any time for any reason at no cost.
  • What is included in an adoption fee?
    Adoption Fees: Puppies, Adult Dogs, and Senior Dogs All Puppies and Dogs will receive the following Vaccines (DDHP series, Bordetella and Rabies), Heartworm test, heartworm, flea, and tick medication until adopted, fecal exam, spay or neuter, microchip, and veterinary care. Puppies (12 months and under) adoption fees are $400 plus tax ($433) Adult Dogs (1-7 years of age) are $260 plus tax ($281.45) Senior Dogs (8 and older) are $125 plus tax ($135.31) Flat-nosed Breed Dogs are $550 plus tax ($595.38) Kittens, Adult Cats, and Senior Cats All Kittens and Cats receive six vaccines (FeLV 1&2, FVRCP 1,2,&3, and Rabies); a snap test, fecal exam; spay or neuter, microchip, and veterinary care. Kittens (12 months and under) are $200 plus tax ($216.50) Adult Cats (1-7 years old) are $100 plus tax ($108.25) Senior Cats (8 years old and up) are $ 75 plus tax ($81.18) Spay/Neuter Deposit: There is a refundable $100 deposit on animals that have not been spayed or neutered. You will receive a refund if the animal is spayed or neutered by 6 months of age.
  • Can I have a Cat/Kitten declawed?
    Dallas Dog strictly prohibits having our felines declawed. There is research to support this decision. One of our adoption team members can discuss this further with you.
  • Why wasn’t I selected to adopt?
    This is a very difficult question to answer. There could be many reasons we sometimes can receive 1 application for an animal or 20. It depends on whether we have an extensive process to help us pick the best family to fit that pet. If you have any questions, please email adopt@dallasdogrrr.org to get feedback on your application and what you can do to be considered for the next available animal.
  • Can I decide not to have my animal spayed/neutered?
    No. Any animal that is released from an animal shelter must be spayed or neutered under Texas law. ANY PUPPY THAT IS NOT ALTERED DUE TO AGE AND WEIGHT WILL HAVE A SPAY AND NEUTER CONTRACT - THERE WILL BE A refundable $100 deposit on animals that have not been spayed or neutered. You will receive a refund if the animal is spayed or neutered by 6 months of age.
  • Do we do out of state adoptions?
    Yes, we do. We require all dogs to be altered prior to leaving the state. The out of state adopter is responsible for the cost of the health certificate and transportation cost. Depending on the dog's breed, you may have to pick up the dog in person in case they are not able to transport.
  • What if we want to rehome our dog to a family member of friend?
    If for some reason you are no longer able to care for your pet and you have located a better placement, we understand things happen. Please contact the rescue and let us know there is paperwork that needs to be completed for the transfer of ownership which includes the microchip contact information.
  • What is your return policy?
    Dallas DogRRR will take back any adopted pet if the adoption does not work out for any reason. Please email us at adopt@dallasdogrrr.org to start the return process. Please specify the reason you are returning your pet so that our team can assist you as quickly as possible. Please be advised that this return will not be effective immediately and that our team will work with you to answer questions and provide next steps. If you are having behavior concerns that you hope to resolve, please contact hello@dallasdogrrr.org. We offer behavior support consultations for all of our adopted animals and would love to work with you to keep your pet in your home!
  • Can I get my adoption donation refunded if my new pet doesn’t work out?
    Unfortunately, we are not able to refund adoption donations as these donations have already been put to good use to help us save even more lives. Our adoption team members are trained to help you find the pet that will be a great fit for your home based on your current lifestyle, other pets in the home, etc. However, we understand that sometimes, adoptions just don’t work out. We are willing to work through any issues that arise and depending on the situation, we may be able to offer an exchange (if the pet you chose doesn’t get along with an existing pet for example). We also have dog and cat behavior teams on staff that offer behavior support for the life of your pet and can help address concerns as they arise to give your new pet the best chance for success in your home. Contact hello@dallasdogrrr.org if you are having behavior concerns that you hope to resolve.
  • I found a pet that I want to adopt but am not sure if he/she will work out in my home with my other pets. Can I do a trial adoption?
    We do trial adoptions in certain situations, but usually just for our adults that are difficult to place. You will be required to do all of the adoption paperwork and pay the adoption fee, but your contract will have a stipulation that entitles you to a full refund if you return the pet to us within a certain timeframe. We don’t do trial adoptions with puppies. Young animals will almost always get along well with other pets in the home. If you have concerns about raising a young pet or introducing a young pet to your current pets, please talk to an adoption counselor or matchmaker. You might discover that one of our older dogs will be a better fit for your lifestyle!
  • What do I do with my new pet if he/she gets sick after I adopt him/her?
    Once an animal has been adopted, you should pursue any medical care with a private vet. Dallas DogRRR cannot continue to provide treatment. However, it occasionally happens that an animal has not been in our care long enough for a health issue to become apparent. If you believe your recent adoptee is sick, please contact our medical team at medicalrequest@dallasdogrrr.org within 10 days of adoption to let us know what's going on, and we can advise you on how to proceed. If there is an emergency please let us know immediately as we will not cover medical costs at a NON APPROVED VET OFFICE.
  • What if I’m having problems with the pet I adopted from Dallas Dog and need help?
    We try to set the right expectations about anything we know about the pet before you adopt (dogs/puppies needing training and possibly housebreaking, separation anxiety possibilities, sociabilities, etc.) but if you are experiencing a problem, we want to help you fix it. We always want the adoption to be a success for both you and your new pet! We have dog and cat behavior staff that are willing to help with any behavioral issues and veterinarians that can offer advice on what to do with medical problems. We want every adoption to be successful. We will follow up with you within the first 90 days after you adopt from us, to ensure that you have the support that you need. If you need to contact us before that, please email us at hello@dallasdogrrr.org. If you need help with behavior issues, please contact our team at hello@dallasdogrrr.org.
  • How do I get the microchip in my name after adoption?
    Once you complete the contract and finalize the adoption process your microchip should be transferred in advance. We will remain on the chip as the secondary owner and you will be the main contact. After 24 hours of your adoption, search your inbox or junk mail for an email from Michelson Pet Registry. This email will assist you with accessing your pet’s microchip account.
  • How to I get my pet's medical records once the adoption is complete?
    You can email medicalrequest@dallasdogrrr.org - please put in the subject line “MEDICAL RECORDS REQUEST” and please provide the original DALLAS DOGRRR NAME (NOT THE NEW NAME OF YOUR ADOPTED PET).
  • Will my records include the rabies tag?
    You can request the rabies tag by emailing medicalrequest@dallasdogrrr.org. Specify "RABIES TAG" in the subject line.
  • Where do adopters email to schedule the last round of vaccines or vet appt’s?
    You will email medicalrequest@dallasdogrrr.org to request vaccines or vet appointments.
  • I have met one of Dallas Dog foster dogs and I am interested in adopting but i do not see the foster on the website. How to I apply?
    If you are interested in a dog that is not active, please fill out our GENERIC APPLICATION.
  • I do not see the pet that I was interested in. They said he was active and on the website. Why can I not see them and what can I do to apply?
    There can be an assortment of reasons for this: the petcould be ill, the pet may have received too many applications already and we are working through those before accepting more. Or the animal may not be available yet. You can email adopt@dallasdogrrr.org if you have specific questions.
  • I do not see the pet that I was interested in. Why can I not see them on the website and what can I do to apply?
    There can be an assortment of reasons for this. The pet may not be adoptable yet, the pet could have become ill, or simply that the pet has received too many applications that we are already processing. You can email adopt@dallasdogrrr.org if you have questions about a specific pet.
  • What is a foster home?
    A foster home is an extension of a shelter’s lifesaving capacity made possible through partnerships with the public. Through fostering, members of the public provide temporary shelter, care, and love for pets in need and serve as their bridge to a forever home. You are a stepping stone for the rest of their journey, and you are their second or maybe final chance before they lose their life.We like to say it is the bridge between their past and their future.
  • How long do I keep a foster dog?
    We ask that you keep your foster dog until adoption, but we require a minimum two week commitment (although, there are frequently shorter-term options available). We are unable to predict how long it will take for your foster pet to be adopted as it is case specific. Young puppies and kittens are typically adopted very quickly, while adult dogs and cats can take a few weeks and sometimes longer. Examples of temporary/short-term fosters includes, but are not limited to: Transport Fosters - temporary placements until the dog is able to go on transport. Vacation Fosters – temporary placement while a permanent foster parent is on vacation and are always needed. Emergency Intake fosters - temporary placement for animals who have been intake on short-notice, or transported from South Texas, and do not have a permanent foster yet.
  • How old do you have to be to foster?
    DogRRR fosters must be at least 18 years old. If foster parents have other individuals living in the home, they must complete a foster application and be approved by Dallas DogRRR. This includes, but is not limited to, family members or roommates.
  • What does Dallas Dog provide to its fosters?
    Every foster should receive the following items: collars, leashes, ID TAG, crates, and puppy pens Food, when available. We cannot guarantee a specific brand - if they need prescription food, we will cover the cost A bonus, if available: beds, treats, toys and chew toys, food bowls etc. Assistance with caring for your foster dog, including behavior and medical support All medical care for your foster dog, as deemed appropriate by our Medical Team Temporary fosters for when you go out of town or on vacation Assistance with marketing your foster dog for adoption, and interacting with potential adopters Educational resources and opportunities Responsive and transparent communication
  • What types of dogs need a foster home?
    All dogs who have not yet found a forever home need a foster home! We have the young fluffy cuties, but our biggest foster need are for pregnant dogs, moms with newborns, orphaned puppies, parvo survivors, seniors, dogs significant medical needs, more active behavior management, dogs needing a break from the shelter, and those who are at risk of euthanasia due to lack of kennel space at Texas animals shelters. Basically, foster care is for all homeless dogs, especially those that need a little extra TLC! With our mission of rescuing those left behind or off the street, the need for foster parents is even greater; every dog that enters a shelter puts another dog at risk, and every time we save a dog it saves another life. Fostering is a key factor to the first step of the rest of their journey.
  • What are my responsibilities as a foster?
    Providing a safe, clean, and caring environment Providing shelter, food, water, and toys/enrichment Providing exercise and socialization, as appropriate Monitoring any medical and/or behavioral issues and working with our medical and/or behavior teams as needed Picking up your foster dog and transporting them to/from any necessary appointments to the clinic (having a car is beneficial for this purpose, but it is not required) Actively marketing your foster dog for adoption this includes taking pictures, going to our photo shoots, updating bio and posting on social media if you have it. Screening and meeting with potential adopters; being responsive and courteous towards potential adopters; following our adoption protocols Carefully reviewing all of APA!’s dog foster communications and resources and abiding by the rules and responsibilities set forth therein
  • Are there dog-friendly, kid-friendly dogs needing foster homes?"
    Yes! For some of our dogs needing a foster home, we may have information on how they have interacted with kids or dogs in a home or shelter environment. However, Dallas DogRRR cannot guarantee the temperament, behavior, or health of any animal due to coming straight from an animal shelter or right off the streets. We have a guide to decompression which will help with the transition into your home as well as dog-training staff available for consultations. We do our best to provide our fosters with as much information as possible before they bring a foster dog into their homes. We will then work with our fosters to learn more about the dog and their in-home behaviors.
  • Do I need to live in DALLAS to foster a dog?
    Fosters must live within 60 miles of the DFW area. Medical care is provided at several clinics within the metroplex, most potential adopters live in or around the metroplex, and adoption events are all in the DFW area.
  • Who do I contact if I want to be a foster or have questions about fostering?
    foster@dallasdogrrr.org
  • How can I see the dogs available for foster?
    Please visit our website or email foster@dallasdogrrr.
  • What's the difference between a Virtual Foster and a Foster Home?
    A virtual foster (VF) offers love, care, and support from near and far. They won't have their VF dog in their home with them, like a foster home provides. The VF role is more of an advocacy role. You will be paired with a volunteer or a foster to help network and advocate for the long term dogs.
  • How does the Virtual Foster program help dogs and their potential adopters?
    Like a physical foster home, a Virtual Foster knows their dog better than anyone! They know their individual personalities, their quirks, and their favorite things to do. They're able to communicate all of that to someone who is considering adoption, including what kind of home would be most successful for the dog. They are able to reach another media source and further network and advocate for their VF.
  • How can I become a Virtual Foster?
    To become a virtual foster, you must complete a foster contract. To start this process, please go to our website to file out a virtual foster application.
  • Can I still help if I can’t Foster?
    Yes! Help us spread the word that fostering saves lives! One of the most effective ways to recruit new fosters is by word of mouth. Please tell your community about fostering and ask them to email us for more information. Adopt. Volunteer. Donate.
  • When will my foster dog be made active/available for adoption?
    Patti Dawson, President/Director, and Deana, Medical Coordinator, perform a thorough review of the intake list each week. This helps to ensure that available foster dogs have had all of the medical treatment(s) required to be made active for adoption. After this is complete, a list of adoptable dogs is sent to Jill Clay, Adoption Coordinator, and Barbara White, Foster Coordinator. Fosters parents are notified by Jill Clay via email (jill@dallasdogrrr.org) or text message (972-913-6853) that their foster dog will be made active. At this time, you will need to determine if you plan to foster-fail (adopt) or if you have a friend or family member interested in adopting your foster dog. If you have not received a notification that your foster is eligible for adoption after 2-3 weeks of their intake and meet the below requirements, please email Deana at deana@dallasdogrrr.org. Requirements for Active/Available foster dogs: Puppies (under five months old) - active after their second round of vaccines. Puppies (over five/six months old) - active after their second round of vaccines AND spayed/neutered. Adult - active once they have received two rounds of vaccinations and spayed/neutered. Foster dogs must be given 10 days to recover post-spay/neuter surgery before adoption. If an adult dog is Heartworm Positive - same basic requirements apply plus treatment for Heartworm Disease (some exceptions are made with treatment to foster-to-adopt but this must be approved by the medical team). Dogs arriving from South Texas - must do a two week quarantine and meet the above requirements. NOTE: If a dog from the same transport as your foster gets sick, all foster dogs from that transport are locked down for an additional two weeks (if it is a dog that will take a while to become active earlier with an updated bio about the heartworm positive status).
  • When do I have to decide if I want to foster-fail (adopt)?
    foster is always given the opportunity to foster-fail (adopt) their foster dog. However, this must be decided prior to making the dog active on our website and setting up meet and greets. If you decide you would like to adopt your foster, you will be sent an adoption contract that you are required to fill out and pay the adoption fee. If you don’t want to foster-fail (adopt) but have a friend or family member interested, please contact Jill Clay (adopt@dallasdogrrr.org) and/or Barbara White (Foster@dallasdogrrr.org) ASAP, before the dog is made active/available for adoption.
  • What are the medical requirements needed for my foster dog?
    Puppies under five months old are required to have three rounds of shots as well as a rabies vaccine. These occur every three to four weeks. Puppies over five months old are required to have two rounds of shots, rabies and altered prior to adoption. Adults are required to have two rounds of shots altered prior to adoption. You are your foster dog’s advocate! It is extremely important for you to keep up with your foster dog’s vaccine schedule, monthly flea/tick and heartworm preventative, spay/neuter appointment, and if your dog is not feeling well or gets injured. Monthly preventative care is given out one month at a time so be aware of when it is given! We recommend giving it on the 1st or 15th of the month. Email the medical team to request appointments and preventative at least one week prior. Medicalrequest@dallasdogrrr.org Most importantly, please be patient! Please understand that Dallas DogRRR is 100% volunteer-based and many of our volunteers have full-time employment. We do our best to respond promptly and will follow-up with you as soon as possible. The medical team receives dozens of emails every single day. We try our best to ensure that emails will be responded to within 72 hours. In case of a medical emergency, please contact Deana Varner (LEAD) at 817-217-4203, Barbara White at 215-715-9398, and/or Dana Brown (Asst. Medical Coordinator) at 915-532-7793. If you do not receive a response from Deana, Barbara, or Dana, please call Patti Dawson (Director) at 214-535-3832.
  • What's the difference between a Virtual Foster and a Foster Home?
    A virtual foster (VF) offers love, care, and support from near and far. They won't have their VF dog in their home with them, like a foster home provides. The VF role is more of an advocacy role. You will be paired with a volunteer or a foster to help network and advocate for long term dogs.
  • How does the Virtual Foster program help dogs and their potential adopters?
    Like a physical foster home, a Virtual Foster knows their dog better than anyone! They know their individual personalities, their quirks, and their favorite things to do. They're able to communicate all of that to someone who is considering adoption, including what kind of home would be most successful for the dog. They are able to reach another media source and further network and advocate for their VF.
  • What happens with a Virtual Foster once a dog finds its forever home?
    Virtual Fosters will be assigned to another dog in need and continue the process of finding him to find their forever home.
  • Do I have to live in Texas to be a Virtual Foster?
    No you do not have to live in Texas. That is what makes this program so great; you just have access to social media platforms.
  • What is my responsibility as a Virtual Foster?
    Once you complete the application you will be assigned a virtual foster we ask that you post on your social media platforms tagging and sharing with Dallas Dog. We hope to engage new followers giving our dogs a larger network to find forever homes as Texas is already a overcrowded state with stray animals.
  • How can I become a Virtual Foster?
    To become a virtual foster, you must complete a foster contract. To start this process, please go to our website to file out a virtual Foster Application.
  • How do I become a Dallas Dog Volunteer?
    Follow these steps to become a Dallas Dog Volunteer: Fill out our Volunteer Application. Applications are processed twice weekly by a Dallas Dog volunteer team. Someone will reach out to you. There will be a volunteer orientation coming soon.
  • I completed the online application, now what?"
    Applications are processed twice weekly by the Dallas DogRRR Volunteer Team. In the next few months, we will be requiring volunteers to attend an online orientation.
  • Is there an age limit to volunteering?
    Due to the nature of working with live animals in a stressful environment, we do have an age limit and cannot authorize children 11 and under to volunteer – though we do appreciate their philanthropic spirit! Children 12-15 years of age must volunteer with their oriented parent or legal guardian. Children 16-17 years of age may volunteer on their own once completing the full volunteer onboarding process. Children under 18 years of age are not able to directly volunteer with handling dogs.
  • But do you really need volunteer help?
    Absolutely. We are in dire need of volunteers; they are the lifeblood of this organization. With hundreds of animals in our care, in foster, along with fundraising efforts, fostering needs, and a plethora of other needs, there is never a shortage of things we can use help with.
  • What are the volunteer activities?
    The majority of our volunteer opportunities fall within the areas listed below: Adoption Follow Up A remote position that assists adoptive parents with their questions after adopting from Dallas DogRRR. Adoption Matchmakers A remote position that helps answer inquiries from the public regarding an animal they are interested in adopting. Cat Foster Team Volunteer remotely and help process foster applications, assist our foster parents, send out foster pleas, and much more! Cat Marketing Help get cats adopted by marketing them! Our cat marketing team photographs and video the cats for the website, gather information about them, writes bios, and posts ads to websites like Petfinder and Craigslist. Dog and Cat Marketing Want to really move the needle in helping our dogs and cats find their forever home? The Dallas DogRRR Marketing team may be right for you! Marketing is crucial in helping the wonderful dogs and cats of Dallas Dog shine and stand out to potential adopters. There are a variety of positions available, from highly creative to data entry, making it one of our most varied and flexible volunteer areas! Most positions allow you to choose your own schedule and how much you'd like to volunteer, too. Our primary goal is to present every adoptable animal individually on the Dallas Dog website, so each one is irresistible to their perfect adopter. Our website is our number one tool in finding our foster pets their forever homes. Together we can make this happen! So what are some examples of ways we do this today? Behavior Training and Classes Learn to train dogs and help our pups that need it the very most. Dog Foster Team Volunteer remotely and help process foster applications, assist our foster parents, send out foster pleas, and much more! Dog Marketing Help get dogs adopted by marketing them! Our dog marketing team photographs and videos the dogs for the website, gathers information about the dogs, writes bios, and posts ads to websites like Petfinder and Nextdoor. Dog Walking Ensure our dogs get the walks, exercise, and TLC they need (and deserve) every day. Events Do you enjoy helping and interacting with people? Do you like advocating for a cause? Promote Dallas Dog’s mission, raise donations, and recruit volunteers, fosters, adopters, and donors at special events around town. Work at info tables and booths, and hang out with adoptable animals while representing Dallas Dog. Marketing and Communications Help Dallas Dog market to the masses with one-off projects and ongoing assistance. Medical Program We have a couple hundred animals in our rescue at a time and we can use help with data entry, sorting records, cross checking previously entered data. We need a person in charge of heartworm medication, microchips and sending out Rabies certificates. Volunteer Team Support Support the Volunteer Staff with some at-home tasks such as: responding to emails, data entry and regular correspondence.
  • Can I volunteer without being on site?
    You can! Most of our events are off-site and held at fun venues around the DFW AREA. We also offer plenty of from-home volunteer opportunities.
  • I need to fulfill community service hours, what should I do?"
    Please email hello@dallasdogrrr.org for more information. If you are seeking community service hours for school, an organization, or personal pleasure, please follow the steps under the FAQ: How do I become an Dallas Dog Volunteer? You will be in charge of any documentation, including tracking your volunteer hours. Should you need a signature to verify your volunteer hours please email volunteer@dallasdogrrr.org to coordinate.
  • Are there any ongoing requirements for volunteers?
    We ask that you commit to volunteering a minimum of 3-5 hours a week. However, we have some positions for longer or shorter time frames. Additionally, we require all volunteers to adhere to the Dallas Dog Volunteer Policies, which you can find on your volunteer profile once you have filled out your application. Any questions or concerns about the policies may be directed to volunteer@dallasdogrrr.org.
  • What kind of routine medical care is provided to pets that Dallas Dog rescue?
    All intake animals are immediately examined by our medical team and veterinary partners. They are tested and treated for common medical issues, given vaccinations and preventatives (flea, tick, heartworm, etc.), and micro-chipped. Animals in our custody continue to receive routine medical treatment and monthly preventatives paid for by Dallas Dog. We aim to provide the same standard of care for all our animals, no matter your means.
  • I think my Dallas Dog foster/alum got my other pet sick, will Dallas Dog pay for treatment?"
    Unfortunately, no. As a 501c(3), we can only provide veterinary care for the animals in Dallas Dog custody. We cannot legally diagnose, treat, or give advice for privately owned animals.
  • My private veterinarian disagrees with what the Dallas Dog’s vets told me, what do I do?"
    Like many fields, veterinarians do not always agree on the appropriate treatment plan. So long as your animal is not in Dallas Dog custody, we will respect your right to get a second opinion. However, Dallas Dog is a rescue leader in providing care for animals with extreme or severe medicals needs that would have otherwise been a death sentence. We have extensive experience in shelter medicine and successfully treating complicated medical cases - we always seek a second opinion from the appropriate specialist.
  • Why is my dog not eating?
    Reasons for a poor or no appetite in dogs include stress, illness, and even just a preference for a tastier food. Changes in how your dog is fed, such as location or type of food or food bowl, can affect how much your dog will eat. Changes in environment or people/pets in the environment can also cause a dog to eat less or stop eating. Appetite issues can also be caused by a medical condition.
  • The puppies were crying. How do I get them to stop?
    Let them have time to accumulate your instinct is to pick them up and hold which remember most have never been touched by humans before this is scary and overwhelming give them time to adjust. Remember they may now be separated from their mom and other siblings they need to release, they are safe and will need to adjust to their new normal. TIME AND PATIENCE.
  • Why does my puppy have diarrhea?
    Things to consider change of food, stress, worms, coccidia and giardi: Try to add a little bit of pumpkin, change to chicken and rice or bland diet, for bottle babies this is also from changing from moms milk to formula and changing brand or type of formula. NOTE: If you see straight blood at the end of a stool it is likely from straining or the worms. CALL MEDICAL IMMEDIATELY - if your puppies feces smells like strong metal or you see a blood tone diarrhea.
  • What is cats' medical email?
    catmedical@dallasdogrrr.org
  • What is ringworm and is it actually a worm?
    Despite its name, ringworm is not a worm. It is actually a fungal infection. It is contagious to other animals as well as humans but it is something that is easy to contain as well as treat. Hand washing can help stop the spread and also keep the animal separated from other animals to lessen the exposure.
  • Common Medical Problems
    My foster cat is not eating: There are several factors that go into a cat not eating. It can be stress related, not feeling well, or just being finicky. Try feeding canned tuna/ chicken or meat baby food. If the cat refuses food for 24 hours we will then get a vet appointment set up ASAP. Diarrhea/Blood in stool: One common cause of diarrhea is food change, if there has not been a change of food or any other stressor it is possible it could be from internal parasites. If the diarrhea remains persistent for a few days we will get a vet appointment scheduled. Blood is also very common with diarrhea or constipation. It is usually from irritation or straining and is not a reason to worry. However, if you notice your foster cat has black stool contact medical immediately. Sneezing/Goopy eyes: Cats are prone to upper respiratory infections (URI), especially when they have lived any portion of their lives outside. If you notice your foster cat is sneezing and has colored discharge from the eyes let medical know so we can get an appointment scheduled. If discharge from eyes/nose is clear it is allergies and will clear up on its own in time. Kittens tummy appears to be round and swollen: It is possible that they have some sort of intestinal parasite. A fecal can be at their next appointment and it will be determined if they have any parasites that need to be treated.
  • While in quarantine, what signs do I need to look for for possible illnesses?"
    Diarrhea, coughing, lack of appetite, lethargic, dehydration and pale gums
  • What if my puppy or dog has Diarrhea?
    Diarrhea can be caused by several factors, including stress, change of diet, poor diet, eating garbage, parasites and viruses. If your foster dog has diarrhea and has no other symptoms, rule out a change of diet by feeding your dog 2 cups of cooked rice mixed with one cup of boiled chicken for a day or two, and then reintroduce dry kibble. Provide plenty of fresh water since diarrhea can cause dehydration. To check for dehydration, pull the skin up over the shoulder blades. If it snaps back quickly, the dog is not dehydrated. If the skin goes down slowly, then the dog is dehydrated and needs fluids. Call your Coordinator immediately if you suspect your foster is dehydrated. In an emergency, take your foster directly to your vet.
  • What is Parvo?
    Parvo attacks the intestinal tract, white blood cells and heart muscle. Signs of infection are depression, loss of appetite, vomiting, severe diarrhea, fever and sometimes kennel cough symptoms. The illness is contracted through contact with the infected feces of another dog. Call your Coordinator immediately if you believe your foster dog may have this illness.
  • When can my foster puppy's paws touch the ground?
    Every dog that enters our care has the potential to carry diseases that can vary from worms to coccidia, giardia and parvo. All dogs need to complete a two week quarantine as a requirement from the rescue. Quarantine is during initial intake and off South Texas Transport.
  • What does this mean for taking a dog outside in the yard during quarantine?
    Puppies 6 months of age - Adult Dogs would be allowed outside during quarantine in a controlled environment this means that you walk on a leash to an area away from normal traffic. You would use this area for the two week quarantine period. Puppies under 6 months- ABSOLUTELY NO PAWS ON THE GROUND FOR THE ENTIRE 2 WEEK QUARANTINE! If you have any questions please contact medicalrequest@dallasodogrrr.org they will help with any questions you may have. Once quarantine is complete, when can my foster dog go into the yard? NEW FOSTERS - MUST GET APPROVAL FROM MEDICAL TO RELEASE THEIR PUPPY INTO THE YARD FOR THE FIRST TIME! Please email medicalrequest@dallasdogrrr.org PREVIOUS NON PARVO APPROVED FOSTER- Once released and approved by the medical team a puppy can have paws in your yard with supervision once they have received their first vaccine. It is important that you know your yard is safe and secure from any chance of PARVO! PREVIOUS PARVO FOSTERS WHEN YARD IS CONTAMINATED OR IS IN QUESTION OF CONTAMINATION- it is critical that we are aware of this PARVO is a deadly virus to puppies. If you are at all in question PLEASE DO NOT PUT YOUR PUPPIES IN THE YARD. This does not take you out of the running for being able to foster. We just have to develop an alternative approach that would be a discussion you would have with the medical team. FOSTER LIVES IN AN APARTMENT- It is important to find an area less frequented by tenants so that you do the best you can not to expose your foster to the potential diseases in the complex. Please if you can walk on sidewalks to get to the area that would be preferred. Puppies 6 months of age - Adult Dogs would be allowed outside during quarantine in a controlled environment this means that you walk on a leash to an area away from normal traffic. You would use this area for the two week quarantine period. Puppies under 6 months- ABSOLUTELY NO PAWS ON THE GROUND FOR THE ENTIRE 2 WEEK QUARANTINE! If you have any questions please contact medicalrequest@dallasodogrrr.org they will help with any questions you may have. Once quarantine is over puppies would require a minimum of two vaccines before paws on the ground. This is just for potty training and breaks. I would NOT begin leash training in common areas till they are fully vaccinated.
  • When can I take my puppy into public places and start walking on the leash through the neighborhood?
    This applies to all dogs not until they are fully vaccinated post 2 weeks. Parvo and other infections have been extremely high and can be deadly to our puppies! SAFETY FIRST
  • What kind of routine medical care is provided to pets that Dallas DogRRR rescue?
    All intake animals are immediately examined by our medical team and veterinary partners. They are tested and treated for common medical issues, given vaccinations and preventatives (flea, tick, heartworm, etc.), and micro-chipped. Animals in our custody continue to receive routine medical treatment and monthly preventatives paid for by Dallas DogRRR. We aim to provide the same standard of care for all our animals, no matter your means.
  • I think my Dallas DogRRR foster/alum got my other pet sick, will Dallas DogRRR pay for treatment?"
    Unfortunately, no. As a 501c(3), we can only provide veterinary care for the animals in Dallas DogRRR custody. We cannot legally diagnose, treat, or give advice for privately owned animals.
  • My private veterinarian disagrees with what the Dallas DogRRR’s vets told me, what do I do?"
    Like many fields, veterinarians do not always agree on the appropriate treatment plan. So long as your animal is not in Dallas DogRRR custody, we will respect your right to get a second opinion. However, Dallas DogRRR is a rescue leader in providing care for animals with extreme or severe medicals needs that would have otherwise been a death sentence. We have extensive experience in shelter medicine and successfully treating complicated medical cases - we always seek a second opinion from the appropriate specialist.
  • Why is my dog not eating?
    Reasons for a poor or no appetite in dogs include stress, illness, and even just a preference for a tastier food. Changes in how your dog is fed, such as location or type of food or food bowl, can affect how much your dog will eat. Changes in environment or people/pets in the environment can also cause a dog to eat less or stop eating. Appetite issues can also be caused by a medical condition.
  • The puppies were crying . How do I get them to stop?
    Let them have time to accumulate your instinct is to pick them up and hold which remember most have never been touched by humans before this is scary and overwhelming give them time to adjust. Remember they may now be separated from their mom and other siblings they need to release, they are safe and will need to adjust to their new normal. TIME AND PATIENCE.
  • Why does my puppy have diarrhea?
    Things to consider change of food, stress, worms, coccidia and giardi: Try to add a little bit of pumpkin, change to chicken and rice or bland diet, for bottle babies this is also from changing from moms milk to formula and changing brand or type of formula. NOTE if you need straight blood at the end of a stool it is likely from straining or the worms. CALL MEDICAL IMMEDIATELY - if your puppies feces smells like strong metal or you see a blood tone diarrhea.
  • Why does the rescue require altering my dog by 6 months of age?
    Yes it is true that most veterinarians will recommend waiting until a dog is closer to one year of age before doing their spay or neuter. Unfortunately as a rescue we cannot wait that long. Shelters require spay and neuter to adopt a puppy or dog and as a rescue we are also held to that same standard. Some rescues even require puppies as young as 10 weeks old to be altered before going to their adopters. We have discussed this with our team of veterinarians and we spay and neuter between 4 to 6 months of age. We have rescued over 5000 dogs to date and have not had any issues. In order to combat the overpopulation of unwanted animals in Texas we must all work together. As currently written, HB 4277 and SB 1845 would: Require every person who owns a dog or cat at least six months of age to have the animal spayed or neutered.
  • When is my foster dog made available for adoption?
    Once your foster dog is off quarantine the team looks at many things prior to being made active. We look at shot history, how many puppies are going live, and they are medically cleared. Once they are cleared adult dogs can go after they are altered or once they are scheduled. (If it is hard to adopt a dog this may vary) Puppies under 6 months of age are considered to be active once off quarantine between their first and second round of vaccinations.
  • When will my foster puppy be able to go to adopters?
    Puppies under 6 months of age can go to the adopters after their second round of vaccinations. Puppies over 6 months of age must be altered and have a minimum of 2 rounds of vaccinations. They must be microchipped as well please confirm at the vet appointments they are chipped.
  • Can you give your dog human meds?
    Yes, there are a few human medicines that pets can take, but it's not that simple. While some human drugs can be given to pets on a regular basis, others can be very toxic. Always get specific pet medicine instructions from your veterinarian.
  • How does my dog get worms?
    Dogs and cats get easily infected with worms especially the younger ones – puppies and kitties are highly susceptible. And the most common worms that infect your dog are roundworm and hookworm. It is not so distinctive to find puppies of only 2-3 weeks of age to be harboring a huge number of worms. This phenomenon usually occurs because these internal parasites are passed from a mother to her puppies before birth. And, at times, they are passed through milk shortly after birth.
  • What if my dog has Parasites?
    Parasites can cause diarrhea, stomach bloating or vomiting. Parasites Include tapeworms, roundworms, hookworms and mange. Tapeworms will look like pieces of rice coming out of your foster dog’s anus or in his stool. Roundworms and hookworms may be vomited, and roundworms look like spaghetti (hookworms are smaller and rarely distinguishable without the aid of a microscope). Mange is an infestation of tiny mites that bite and cause intense scratching, reddened skin and loss of fur. Only rare cases of mange (sarcoptic) are contagious to humans. If you suspect your foster dog has parasites, email medical immediately.
  • What is Dallas Dog Heartworm treatment protocol?
    Let me start with this may vary with some dogs depending on their heartworm status and how far they are along with the heartworm disease. Our protocol is 30 days of doxycycline, we will schedule the foster dog’s spay or neuter about 2-4 weeks after beginning the doxycycline. Once they complete the doxycycline and are altered they will be scheduled for the treatment that consists of two- three injections and that is determined by our veterinarian staff. Once the foster dog receives the injections they are on strict crate rest or able to rest quietly in the home at this time no adoption events, running or playing with residence dogs. You can go on slow and short leash walks. Please check with medical if you are uncertain of the protocols and release date. After treatment they must remain on heartworm prevention for 6 months as part of the treatment. It is essential they remain on prevention for the rest of their lives.
  • Can my heartworm positive dog take preventative?
    Yes, they should be taking it each month. You can request it at vet appointments and through medicalrequest@dallasdogrrr.org
  • What is the success rate of heartworm treatment?
    A new drug is available that does not have as many side effects, allowing successful treatment of more than 95% of dogs with heartworms. Many dogs have advanced heartworm disease at the time they are diagnosed.
  • How do we prevent Heartworm Disease?
    Treat your dog with monthly heartworm preventatives to control heartworm infections. Monthly heartworm medications like Heartgard Plus, TriHeart, Iverhart Max, and Revolution are highly effective and act as a potent shield against diseases due to worms in your furry friend.
  • When can my foster interact with my resident dog?
    After proper introductions after the 2 week mandatory quarantine period.
  • My foster dog has mange. Is this contagious?
    There are two types: Demodectic Mange, caused by the mite Demodex canis, and Sarcoptic Mange, caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei. There are very distinct differences between them: Demodectic Mange is NOT contagious to other dogs, cats, or humans, while Sarcoptic Mange is contagious to humans and other dogs. If your personal dog is on multi-advantage it is protected.
  • My foster dogs have fleas. What can I do to get rid of them?
    It is best to bathe your foster dog in Dawn dish soap. It will immediately kill the fleas then request flea prevention from the medical team.
  • My foster dog has kennel cough?
    The shelter is much like a child day care – as soon as one dog has a cold, most of the dogs in the shelter get a cold. Just like people who have colds, kennel cough develops when the dog is stressed or when the immune system is compromised. Kennel cough usually goes away as soon as the dog has a warm, quiet and soothing place to sleep, where they can drink lots of water, eat healthy food and receive lots of TLC! Kennel cough is typically a dry, hacking cough. There may be some discharge from the nose and a clear liquid that is coughed up. It’s generally a mild, self-limiting illness of the trachea and bronchi encountered in all age groups of dogs, but especially in those under unusual stress. Because kennel cough is contagious, infected dogs should not be around other dogs until they’re over their cough. If you have a dog at home and plan to foster a dog with kennel cough, we have found that if your own dog is healthy and has been vaccinated annually, then he will most likely not get sick. Talk to your vet about giving your own dog the Bordetella nasal vaccination. Immunity to kennel cough is usually established 3-4 days after vaccination. Make sure your foster dog has plenty of fresh water and healthy food. If your dog is not eating, try cooking up something special and smelly such as eggs, chicken or steak. Take short, leashed walks. If your dog’s energy is good and the cough seems mild, try some Vitamin C (5-10 mg/lb, 2-3 times a day with food) and Vitamin E (3-5 mg/lb, once a day). If you don’t see improvement of the cough or cold after 3 days, or if the condition worsens, reach out to the medical team.
  • What are the medical requirements needed for my foster dog?
    VACCINATIONS Puppies under five months old are required to have three rounds of shots, as well as a rabies vaccine. These occur every three to four weeks. Puppies/Adult Dogs over five months old are required to have two rounds of shots, including the rabies vaccine, prior to adoption. ​ MICROCHIP All dogs are required to be microchipped ​ ALTERED ALL DOGS ARE REQUIRED TO BE ALTERED WHEN ADOPTING FROM THE RESCUE. ​ HEARTWORM PREVENTION All dogs over the age of 8 weeks are required to be on heartworm prevention. It is the foster's responsibility to request this monthly from the Medical team. If a dog has just finished heartworm treatment, monthly heartworm preventatives are required as part of the treatment. How to request: email medicalrequest@dallasdogrrr.org and put request heartworm prevention - Do NOT wait until the last minute to request, we will need time to get the medication from certain locations around the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex or at our veterinary partners. Please keep track of the date given, we need this for their records. All fosters, even if heartworm positive, are required to take heartworm preventative. ​ FLEA PREVENTION It is not a requirement for a foster dog to be on flea prevention. If you need it, please request it by emailing medicalrequest@dallasdogrrr.org it will be considered on a case by case basis. All of our dogs are treated upon intake with flea prevention to aid in flea control and skin conditions. MEDICAL RECORDS If you are given paperwork from a vets office, please email a copy of the records to medicalrequest@dallasdogrrr.org.
  • Why does Dallas Dog ask fosters to quarantine?
    ALL NEW INTAKES are to be quarantines for a minimum of 2 weeks. This includes shelter dogs, street dogs and South Texas dogs (transport resets their quarantine time). Quarantine is important as to not expose other dogs in your home or contaminate your property. It is important to make sure we clean all crates and other items when transporting or when a foster leaves.
  • What are the quarantine requirements?
    ADULT Best Practices- Adult dogs should be leashed and taken to a separate area to potty. If that is not feasible, please monitor and pick up poop. Place a crate in an area away from other dogs if able. PUPPIES Puppies are to be quarantined and placed in a controlled environment with NO PAWS ON THE GROUND. Please use ONLY pee pads and hard surfaces during quarantine. Minimize foot traffic into other rooms in the house. Please clean your feet after leaving the puppy area. Things like PARVO, COCCIDIA, GIARDIA, and worms are transferred by tiny particles of feces. NO PAWS ON YOUR YARD. If a dog breaks with PARVO and has been in your yard, it will be contaminated for at least a year. You will NOT BE ABLE TO FOSTER UNVACCINATED DOGS. It is important to remember that puppies need a safe, controlled environment after they are rescued. It is essential to keep them in the quarantine area at all times. We know it is difficult to hear these babies cry when you leave, and hard not to take them with you, but they need this time to adjust and decompress. This is also important for quarantine purposes. If the dog has parvo and has not yet broken, all areas of your home could be contaminated. Keeping your pup in one area helps with cleaning and decontaminating the area if exposure occurs. If you have two separate litters please make sure to clean your shoes, change your shirt and wash your hands when handling the next litter until quarantine is over.
  • What is transport?
    Transport is a fantastic opportunity for our dogs! We partner with three shelters in Washington state to send some of our dogs to find their forever homes. Why do we do this? We live in a state that has the largest number of dogs being dumped and euthanized. The number of requests we receive for help on a daily basis is overwhelming. We save as many as we can but we can only do so much. Washington state, by contrast, has not had to euthanize for space in over 10 years! They actually need dogs for their communities. This is where we come in.
  • Why do they have to go on transport at all? Why can't we keep them here?
    Transport is a vital tool for saving Texas dogs. The main reason we need transport is that Texas is one of the highest kill states in the US. Due to our overpopulation, there are simply not enough homes for all of the dogs here. The Pacific Northwest has had good spay and neuter programs and requirements and therefore have been no-kill states for over 10 years. Most people prefer to rescue a dog in need from the shelter versus buy one from a breeder. For every dog who goes to the Pacific Northwest it saves three dogs. A foster home is opened up which allows another dog to be pulled, which opens a space in an overcrowded shelter.
  • How do we know they are safe?
    Honestly, we do not know that even when they are adopted here in Texas. Even with the extensive screening and adoption application process we have in place, we have unfortunately had a few bad local adopters. We have had our dogs given away, abandoned in yards or the shelter, or dumped on the street here in Dallas. Ultimately, we do our best to give our dogs the best chance we can at having a happy life.
  • Why was my foster selected for transport?
    There are a variety of factors taken into consideration before any dog is submitted for transport. It may be that we have an unusually large puppy population that can be quickly reduced by sending them north where they will be snapped right up. Your pup may be beautiful to you, but the truth may be they will be virtually unadoptable here in Texas. The Pacific Northwest is a very open and accepting environment for our larger dogs that would otherwise sit in the rescue for a long period of time.
  • How does the transport process work?
    The first step is the DogRRR leadership team submits pictures and bios of dogs they have determined are good candidates for transport to one, or a number, of our Pacific Northwest partners. The shelter staff evaluates each dog to determine their adaptability based on the demographics of their community. They are then either approved or denied for transport, and you, as the foster, will be notified of their decision.
  • Can I foster fail when my dog is submitted for transport?
    Fosters are notified at the time of SUBMISSION so they can begin to prepare for the separation from their dog, or they can decide to foster fail. Notice of any foster fail must be given when they receive the notice that their dog is being SUBMITTED. A great deal of thought goes into selecting the right dogs to go on transport. The leadership of DogRRR works diligently with all of the information at their disposal to determine which dogs should be submitted. However, we do understand there may be a case when the foster wants to keep the dog. Keep in mind, this should be a rational decision based on how the dog fits with the foster family rather than an emotional decision based on the fear of transport. It’s never easy to let them go, but we owe it to our partners to provide them what they have agreed to, so no foster failing is permitted once the dog has been APPROVED for transport.
  • Where will my foster be going?
    DogRRR partners with a number of shelters in the Washington State Area. Please know the term “shelter” is not the same as it is here in Texas. These are wonderful facilities staffed with employees and volunteers all working to provide the best care to our dogs until they get their forever home. Sometimes the dogs are not ready for adoption when they arrive - they may have developed a little cough, or have been seriously anxious, so they may be placed with a foster family for a short time.
  • Will I hear from the adoptive family?
    Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that we will hear from them. We ask that you submit a letter that we include in the foster dog packet. The rescue also sends a letter as some adopters do not understand the foster process and will sometimes reach out to the rescue vs. fosters. Simple answer, there is no guarantee. We always hope the adoptive families will reach out to the fosters, and many do. Unfortunately, sometimes they do not reach out. We have an amazing team of volunteers that work with the shelters and volunteers to get this information and stress what it means to the fosters to see their dog in their forever home, but sadly that does not always happen.
  • How is my dog transported?
    The are transported sometimes by air and sometimes by Tall Tales Transport and Rescue. We have worked with her for over 6 years. She drives a modified trailer designed to haul race cars with reinforced walls for a crash. It has 3 rooftop Coleman AC units with their own generator; this helps with better climate control and it is quieter for the animals on transport. They also carry a spare Coleman generator in case something happens on the trip. There are 2 carbon dioxide sensors and 4 cameras, 2 that are placed in the aisles and 2 extra that can be placed for another angle or on a specific kennel or dog in crisis. There is sound on the cameras, so they are able to hear distress or barking of the dogs on the trailer. The dogs are walked throughout the day at regular intervals. They carry over 400 pounds of food in the trailer, and the dogs are fed twice a day. Because of their size, and their metabolism, puppies are fed at least 3 times a day. Each dog has a water bowl affixed to their crate, and Kay walks the trailer at every stop to make sure they have something to drink. There is also a tracker on the trailer in case they were to be stranded or run into trouble.
  • How long is the trip?
    The trip takes about 3-4 days depending on weather conditions, traffic and fires. Think of it as a long road trip with the promise of a forever home waiting at the end. Yes, it is a rough few days but the outcome of finding their forever home far outweighs the few days of travel.
  • What happens to dogs that struggle on transport?
    There are cameras on the transport trailer which are monitored. If a dog gets sick we are notified and if there is an emergency, an emergency vet is located and contacted. If a dog is struggling with behavioral issues, this is dealt with on a case by case situation. We let the incoming shelter know the dog is experiencing difficulties and they have volunteers scheduled to help and give them time to decompress. They are well equipped to deal with such issues and will very rarely “give up” on an animal. They have behavioral programs staffed with employees and volunteers that are committed to working with them until they are adoptable.
  • What happened? I do not see my foster dog on the website.
    This question has different answers. If we send a dog that is not altered, they must be altered prior to adoption and will remain inactive until surgery is scheduled or completed. If the animal arrived and was struggling behaviorally, they will give the animal time to adjust, and continue to evaluate. This is a good thing because it allows the volunteer to connect with your foster and better understand their needs, which helps when finding the right adopter.
  • Can I contact the shelter directly?
    We ask that you reach out to our rescue (and not our partners) as they are very busy handling their own daily business. We are more than happy to get any information to help our fosters. We have worked very closely with these shelters in building relationships with them. We want to be able to continue the transport process, as it is essential to our process and sustainability in rescue. These partnerships allow us to save more dogs due to Texas' pet overpopulation. Please remember if you do speak to a volunteer, be kind and courteous as we know emotions can overwhelm us during this time.
  • What requirements does my foster dog need to be submitted for transport?
    All dogs 6 months or older MUST test negative for heartworms within 30 days of transport. All dogs and puppies must have a minimum of two rounds of shots. All dogs must be a minimum of one month off quarantine. All dogs must be healthy and have a negative fecal.
  • How does the team decide which puppies and dogs are submitted for transport?
    The team discusses how how many dogs are currently in the rescue. We look at the list of active dogs and how long they have been in the rescue. We also look at who has had interest and who has not. Age is considered once a puppy hits the teenage years (over 6 months). They are automatically considered for transport, as they are the hardest to get adopted since people want either younger or older dogs. We look at the length of time in the rescue. This is a huge factor, as the longer we have had them, the harder they are to get adopted here. The number of puppies we have in the rescue is also a consideration. Puppies are adopted sometimes within hours of arrival, and transport is a fabulous way to reduce our puppy population. If a puppy has moved around a lot then they are also considered. Owner Returns are automatically considered. This gives them a chance at a new start without the return in their history. A dog will be considered for submission if a foster or team member requests.
  • Who approves the final list? Who chooses who goes?
    The team, which includes someone from the foster team, adoption team, medical and the director, reviews the suggested dogs. A list is created which includes, bio, information, behavior and medical records, and all the information is sent to our partners. Once submitted, our partner shelters review the list and ask questions, review medical records and choose what dogs they can take depending on space, breed, age and size. They want to make sure they will be able to adapt to their community. For example, Seattle has a lot of apartments and not large yards, so they make sure that the dogs will be ok in those environments. Once chosen, we let our team know and they begin informing fosters who has been selected.
  • Oh no! My foster dog has been returned!
    This is ok. Our partners know, and have signed an agreement, that our dogs are NOT to be euthanized and they are to be returned to us. What does that mean? It means they will hold until our next transport, or we fly them back. Keep in mind, dogs can be returned for a number of reasons, not always the problem of the Texas dog. What if there is a resident dog that won’t accept the new dog that was adopted? The adopter may return. Returns are not necessarily bad. They can be helpful in some cases as our partners do not know the dogs like we do, so when they come back they have a better idea of what the dog will need in his or her next placement. Washington shelters are not like Texas shelters. Dogs there are given a second chance, with opportunities for enrichment, training, and options to stay with fosters. They have a whole behavior team to work with these pups. OUR RESCUE PARTNERS ALL REALLY CARE ABOUT OUR BABIES!
  • What is the foster responsible for after their foster dog is selected for transport?
    The foster is responsible to take the dog to the vet for the health check appointment that is required to get the necessary paperwork for travel. If they are unable to do so, they simply need to let the transport team know so we can make arrangements to get them to their appointment. We ask that they help look for transportation and be flexible as we are limited on when these can be scheduled. We also ask each foster to write a note about their pup; this helps the adopter know more about the pup from the foster's perspective. Tell the adoptive family your dog’s story, tell them about their life with you and what makes them special. Always keep it positive. The final step is help in getting them to the transport location or at minimum a location where they can meet the transporter. The logistics of moving a large number of dogs in a short amount of time can be overwhelming, so a positive attitude as things change and come together is most appreciated. The day your pup gets on transport will be sad for every foster, but we have volunteers to keep you apprised of the entire journey and have no doubt, you will be CELEBRATING when you see your dog get their perfect family.
  • What can I send with my foster dog on transport?
    We are limited on space so you can send a small toy, chewy, and small blanket; but it all has to fit in a gallon size ziploc bag. As you can imagine, the offloading process can be a little chaotic when our dogs arrive at the shelter. Our transporters try their very best to ensure each dog's belongings go along with them, but their main priority remains each pup's safety and well being while they are getting settled in. Due to this focus on safety, we cannot guarantee that each thing you send with your pup will transfer to the shelter with each pup.
  • Once they arrive, how long until they are available for adoption?"
    This depends on the dog. If unaltered, the dog needs to be altered prior to adoption. If the dog is having difficulty, they will allow it time to adjust. Most dogs are adoptable the day they arrive.
  • How long do they remain in the shelter?
    The length or time varies, depending on the dog. Puppies are usually adopted within two weeks. There are times they may be a little longer but that is very rare. Adoption times for adult dogs varies. Many times our adult dogs arrive on Thursday and are adopted by the end of their first weekend in Washington. We have never had a dog stay in the shelter longer than 4 months.
  • What happens if my dog is not adopted?
    We have never had a dog not adopted in Washington. We have had dogs returned or those with difficulty adjusting, and we have an agreement with the shelter to return them back to the rescue. They will work tirelessly to rehabilitate and find the perfect place for that pup. The team stays in communication with our rescue the whole time.
  • What kinds of dogs are adopters looking for on transport? What kinds of dogs get adopted quickly?
    They love small dogs and PUPPIES! Puppies are usually snapped up within days, but the adopters in the Pacific Northwest are open to any dogs. They are all looking for large breed dogs to go hiking, paddle boarding and enjoy the beaches and lakes. Dogs we know will not find homes here in Texas are sent to Washington and adopted.
  • Are there dogs that are not good for transport?
    Heartworm positive dogs.
  • Why can't little dogs stay here? They are so easy to get adopted.
    The purpose of sending dogs to Washington is to lower our population here, and make room to save more dogs. We all know there are always more lives that need saving here in Texas. Providing a good mix of puppies and little dogs together with our big dogs, gives all our dogs the best advantage to be seen and get homes quickly.
  • What are the dates for transport?
    The dates are dependent on our transporter. If she is doing one transport in a month, it is the first Tuesday of the month. She may add a second transport, which is the third Tuesday of the month.
  • Why do they have to go on transport at all? Why can't we keep them here?
    Transport is a vital tool for saving Texas dogs. The main reason we need transport is that Texas is one of the highest kill states in the US. Due to our overpopulation, there are simply not enough homes for all of the dogs here. The Pacific Northwest has had good spay and neuter programs and requirements and therefore have been no-kill states for over 10 years. Most people prefer to rescue a dog in need from the shelter versus buy one from a breeder. For every dog who goes to the Pacific Northwest it saves three dogs. A foster home is opened up which allows another dog to be pulled, which opens a space in an overcrowded shelter.
  • How do we know they are safe?
    Honestly we do not know that here. Even with the screening and adoption application process we have in place, we have had our dogs given away, abandoned in yards or the shelter and dumped on the street. Ultimately we give the dogs the best chance we can at having a happy life.
  • Why was my foster selected for transport?
    There are a variety of factors taken into consideration before any dog is submitted for transport. It may be that we have an unusually large puppy population that can be quickly reduced by sending them north where they will be snapped right up. Your pup may be beautiful to you, but the truth may be they will be virtually unadoptable here in Texas. The Pacific Northwest is a very open and accepting environment for our larger dogs that would otherwise sit in the rescue for a long period of time.
  • How does the transport process work?
    The first step is the DogRRR leadership team submits pictures and bios of dogs they have determined are good candidates for transport to one, or a number, of our Pacific Northwest partners. The shelter staff evaluates each dog to determine their adaptability based on the demographics of their community. They are then either approved or denied for transport, and you, as the foster, will be notified of their decision.
  • Can I foster fail when my dog is submitted for transport?
    Fosters are notified at the time of SUBMISSION so they can begin to prepare for the separation from their dog, or they can decide to foster fail. Notice of any foster fail must be given when they receive the notice that their dog is being SUBMITTED. A great deal of thought goes into selecting the right dogs to go on transport. The leadership of DogRRR works diligently with all of the information at their disposal to determine which dogs should be submitted. However, we do understand there may be a case when the foster wants to keep the dog. Keep in mind, this should be a rational decision based on how the dog fits with the foster family rather than an emotional decision based on the fear of transport. It’s never easy to let them go, but we owe it to our partners to provide them what they have agreed to, so no foster failing is permitted once the dog has been APPROVED for transport.
  • Where will my foster be going?
    DogRRR partners with a number of shelters in the Washington State Area. Please know the term “shelter” is not the same as it is here in Texas. These are wonderful facilities staffed with employees and volunteers all working to provide the best care to our dogs until they get their forever home. Sometimes the dogs are not ready for adoption when they arrive - they may have developed a little cough, or have been seriously anxious, so they may be placed with a foster family for a short time.
  • Will I hear from the adoptive family?
    Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that we will hear from them. We ask that you submit a letter that we include in the foster dog packet. The rescue also sends a letter as some adopters do not understand the foster process and will sometimes reach out to the rescue vs. fosters. Simple answer, there is no guarantee. We always hope the adoptive families will reach out to the fosters, and many do. Unfortunately, sometimes they do not reach out. We have an amazing team of volunteers that work with the shelters and volunteers to get this information and stress what it means to the fosters to see their dog in their forever home, but sadly that does not always happen.
  • How is my dog transported?
    The are transported sometimes by air and sometimes by Tall Tales Transport and Rescue (KAY). We have worked with her for over 6 years. She drives a modified trailer designed to haul race cars with reinforced walls for a crash. It has 3 roof top Coleman AC units with their own generator; this helps with better climate control and it is quieter for the animals on transport. They also carry a spare Coleman generator in case something happens on the trip. There are two CO2 sensors and 4 cameras, 2 that are placed in the aisles and two extra they can be placed for another angle or on a specific kennel or dog in crisis. There is sound on the cameras, so they are able to hear distress or barking of the dogs on the trailer. The dogs are walked throughout the day at regular intervals. They carry over 400 pounds of food in the trailer, and the dogs are fed twice a day. Because of their size, and their metabolism, puppies are fed at least 3 times a day. Each dog has a water bowl affixed to their crate, and Kay walks the trailer at every stop to make sure they have something to drink. There is also a tracker on the trailer in case they were to be stranded or run into trouble.
  • What happens to dogs that struggle on transport?
    There are cameras on the transport trailer which are monitored. If a dog gets sick we are notified and if there is an emergency, an emergency vet is located and contacted. If a dog is struggling with behavioral issues, this is dealt with on a case by case situation. We let the incoming shelter know the dog is experiencing difficulties and they have volunteers scheduled to help and give them time to decompress. They are well equipped to deal with such issues and will very rarely “give up” on an animal. They have behavioral programs staffed with employees and volunteers that are committed to working with them until they are adoptable.
  • What happened? I do not see my dog on the website?
    This question has different answers. If we send a dog that is not altered, they must be altered prior to adoption and will remain inactive till surgery is scheduled or completed. If the animal arrived and was struggling behaviorally, they will give the animal time to adjust, and continue to evaluate. This is a good thing because it allows the volunteer to connect with your foster and better understand their needs which helps when finding the right adopter.
  • Can I contact the shelter directly?
    We ask that you reach out to our rescue and not our partners as they are very busy handling their own daily business. We are more than happy to get any information to help our fosters. We have worked very closely with these shelters in building relationships with them and we want to be able to continue the transport process as it is essential to our process and sustainability in rescue. These partnerships allow us to save more dogs due to Texas pets' overpopulation. Please remember if you do speak to a volunteer, be kind and courteous as we know emotions can overwhelm us during this time.
  • What requirements does my foster dog need to be submitted for transport?
    All dogs 6 months or older MUST test negative for heartworms within 30 days of transport. All dogs and puppies must have a minimum of two rounds of shots. All dogs must be a minimum of one month off quarantine. All dogs must be healthy and have a negative fecal.
  • How does the team decide which puppies and dogs are submitted for transport?
    The team discusses how many current dogs are in the rescue. We look at the list of active dogs and how long they have been in the rescue. We also look at who has had interest and who has not. Age is considered once a puppy hits the teenage years (over 6 months). They are automatically considered for transport as they are the hardest to get adopted since people want either younger or older dogs. We look at the length of time in the rescue. This is a huge factor, as the longer we have had them, the harder they are to get adopted here. The number of puppies we have in the rescue is also a consideration. Puppies are adopted sometimes within hours of arrival, and transport is a fabulous way to reduce our puppy population. If a puppy has moved around alot then they are also considered. Owner Returns are automatically considered. This gives them a chance at a new start without the return in their history. A dog will be considered for submission If a foster or team member requests.
  • WHO APPROVES THE FINAL LIST AND WHO CHOOSES WHO GOES?
    The team, which includes someone from the foster team, adoption team, medical and the director, reviews the suggested dogs; the list is created which includes, bio, information, behavior and medical records and all the information is sent to our partners. Once submitted to the receiving partners they review the list and ask questions, review medical records and choose what dogs they can take dependent on space, breed, age and size. They want to make sure they will be able to adapt to their community. For example, Seattle has a lot of apartments and not large yards, so they make sure that the dogs will be ok in those environments. Once chosen we let our team know and they begin letting fosters know who has been selected.
  • Oh no! My foster dog has been returned!
    This is ok. Our partners know, and have signed an agreement, that our dogs are NOT to be euthanized and they are to be returned to us. What does that mean? It means they will hold till our next transport, or we fly them back. Keep in mind, dogs can be returned for a number of reasons, not always the problem of the Texas dog. What if there is a resident dog that won’t accept the new dog that was adopted? The adopter may return. Returns are not necessarily bad. They can be helpful in some cases as our partners do not know the dogs like we do, so when they come back they have a better idea of what the dog will need in his or her next placement. Washington shelters are not like TEXAS shelters; dogs are given a second chance; there are opportunities for enrichment, training and to be able to stay with fosters. They have a whole behavior team to work with these pups. THEY ALL REALLY CARE ABOUT OUR BABIES!
  • What is the foster responsible for after the foster dog is selected for transport?
    The foster is responsible to take the dog to the vet for the health check appointment that is required to get the necessary paperwork for travel. If they are unable to do so, they simply need to let the transport team know so we can make arrangements to get them to their appointment. We ask that they help look for transportation and be flexible as we are limited on when these can be scheduled. We also ask each foster to write a note about their pup; this helps the adopter know more about the pup from the foster's perspective. Tell the adoptive family your dog’s story, tell them about their life with you and what makes them special. Always keep it positive. The final step is help in getting them to the transport location or at minimum a location where they can meet the transporter. The logistics of moving a large number of dogs in a short amount of time can be overwhelming, so a positive attitude as things change and come together is most appreciated. The day your pup gets on transport will be sad for every foster, but we have volunteers to keep you apprised of the entire journey and have no doubt, you will be CELEBRATING when you see your dog gets their perfect family.
  • What can I send with my foster dog on transport?
    We are limited on space so you can send a small toy, chewy, and small blanket but it all has to fit in a gallon size ziploc bag. Everything is off loaded when they arrive, and they try their best to make sure their belongings go with them, however, as you can imagine, it’s a little chaotic when all of our dogs are being unloaded and settled, so there is no guarantee what is sent will arrive with them. WE ASK EVERY FOSTER TO WRITE A LETTER THAT IS PLACED WITH THE DOGS RECORDS SO IT DEFINITELY GETS RECEIVED WITH THEIR PAPERWORK.
  • Once they arrive, how long unil they are available for adoption? "
    This depends on the dog; if it is an unaltered, the dog needs to be altered first. If the dog is having difficulty, they will allow it time to adjust. Otherwise, they are adoptable the day they arrive.
  • How long do they remain in the shelter?
    The length of times varies depending on the dog, however puppies are usually adopted within two weeks max. There are times they may be a little longer but that is very rare. The adult dogs vary; they can be there as little as a week to 3 months. We have not seen anyone stay longer than 4 months. Many times our dogs arrive on Thursday and the majority are adopted by the end of their first weekend in Washington. Of course, there are a number of factors that can affect that. Even the weather and fires they have been experiencing have an affect on the time it takes to get the dogs into their forever homes.
  • What happens if my dog is not adopted?
    We have never had a dog not adopted in Washington. We have had dogs returned or those with difficulty adjusting and we have an agreement with the shelter to return them back to the rescue. They will work effortlessly to rehabilitate and find the perfect place to stay in communication with our rescue the whole time.
  • What kinds of dogs are adopters looking for on transport? What kinds of dogs get adopted quickly?
    They love small dogs and PUPPIES! Puppies are usually snapped up within days, but the adopters in the Pacific Northwest are open to any dogs. They are all looking for large breed dogs to go hiking, paddle boarding and enjoy the beaches and lakes. Dogs we know will not find homes here in Texas are sent to Washington and adopted.
  • Are there any dogs that are not good for transport?
    Heartworm positive dogs.
  • What are the dates for transport?
    The dates are dependent on our transporter. f she is doing one transport in a month, it is the first Tuesday of the month, however, she may add a second which is the third Tuesday of the month.
  • Why can't little dogs stay here? They are so easy to get adopted?
    The purpose of sending dogs to Washington is to lower our population here and make room to save more dogs. We all know there are always more that need saving here in Texas. Providing a good mix of puppies and little dogs together with our big dogs, gives them all the best advantage to be seen and get homes quickly.
  • If my foster dog has behavior or training issues, will they be selected?"
    NEEDS AN ANSWER.
  • Is my donation tax-exempt?
    Yes, we are a 501(c)(3) recognized charity by the IRS. Donations made directly to Dallas DogRRR will be properly acknowledged and you will be given a receipt for your personal records. Our tax ID number is 47-4386830.
  • If my foster dog has behavior or training issues, will they be selected?"
    NEEDS AN ANSWER.
  • When I donate monetarily, what is my money really supporting?"
    All donations to Dallas DogRRR support saving the lives of the thousand plus of animals that come into Dallas DogRRR care each year. Unless you’ve designated funds to be used in a particular way, your monetary donation will support general operations. Your donation will be used where it is needed the most.
  • Why are donations made without restrictions, otherwise known as general donations, important?"
    All donations made to Dallas DogRRR support our mission to save animals at needless risk of death or left on the streets of TEXAS. It includes critical needs you may not have considered, and these fluctuate throughout the year as we respond to the needs of at-risk animals as they occur. When you give generally to our operations, you enable the best use of resources in protecting the lives of thousands of animals.
  • Can I give for a specific program or purpose?
    Absolutely! When you make your online donation you can specify if you’d like for your donation to support a particular species or program. Simply choose the program of your choice from the “Direct Your Gift” drop-down menu.
  • How would I designate my gift for a specific purpose?
    Sending a check? Indicate in the memo section how you’d like us to use your gift or attach a letter describing how you would like your donation to be used. Donating online? Use the “Direct Your Gift” section in our online donation form. If you are unsure how to designate these or any other gift, please contact us at donate@dallasdogrrr.org.
  • How do you ensure you use gifts for a particular purpose?
    Our Development and Finance teams use protocols and technology that allow us to specify and track the use of funds. If you’ve designated how you would like your gift to be used, we flag it for a program, activity, physical need, or fund, and then inform our Finance team how to spend your restricted donations.
  • How do I donate in-kind (non-monetary gifts)?
    You can email hello@dallasdogrr.org to find the closest drop off location near you Or, you can opt to shop on Amazon and have the items delivered directly please check out our current wishlists on our website.. If you would like to host a donation drive or would like to connect with a member of our team with further questions, please email donate@dallasdogrrr.org.
  • I don’t want my in-kind donations to go to waste or get in your way. Are my in-kind donations truly helpful?
    Supplies donated in-kind are vital to our programs. To ensure that you are donating items that we can use, please visit Our Wish List. We keep this page updated with our most current needs. Please note that our needs may change depending on the season so we update our wish list frequently.
  • How do I set up recurring monetary donations?
    Thanks so much for your interest in giving monthly! You can set up recurring donations by becoming a Constant Companion. It’s as simple as filling out a form and selecting the amount you would like to give each month. Find out more here!
  • I'd like to hold a donation drive. Can I? What do I do?
    Yes! We love donation drives as they bring in much-needed donations. You can find donation suggestions via our wish list page and Amazon wish list. Please email hello@dalladogrrr.org with additional questions.
  • I have a large item that I'd like to donate. Can I?
    Please email hello@dallasdogrrr.org to locate a drop off location closest to you.
  • Where do I send a donation made by check?
    Dallas DogRRR 1314 W McDermott Suite 106-741 Allen,TX 75013
  • How do I give through estate or other financial planning?
    We’re honored that you’d like to support Dallas DogRRR through planned giving. You can find out more information here. You can also use this tool to write a free will and easily create a legacy gift with Dallas DogRRR.
  • I'd like to donate in honor of or in memory of someone and have something sent to them. Can I do that?
    Yes! On our donation form, you will fill out the Tributes section. As you fill it out, more options will appear. You will be able to provide the recipient’s information and request an email or mailed card be sent. You can also request that the recipient not be notified of your gift.
  • How do I know if my employer matches my charitable giving?
    Giving in the Workplace Many companies encourage employee giving and may even offer a matching program, encouraging philanthropy among their employees. Employee Giving Many companies make it easy to give to organizations their employees support by helping set up a seamless transaction with each pay period. Talk with your HR department to discuss how you can schedule a set amount to automatically donate to APA!. Employer Matching Do you work for a company that encourages philanthropic giving? Employers understand the importance of giving and, more importantly, understand that their employees care about the impact they can have in their community. Because of this, many employers offer a matching incentive and will double – sometimes triple – your donation! Find out if your employer offers a matching program by searching below. Don’t see your employer on the list? Have a conversation with your HR department to find out if your employer will consider putting a matching program in place or to encourage the start of one!
  • What is your Tax ID number?
    Our tax ID is 47-4386830.
  • I found a lost animal. Can  I keep it?
    No, this pet might belong to someone even if it looks like it has been living on the streets for months, some animals get out and are not able to find their way home and some animals have been stolen and dumped not near where the family lives. It is recommended that you follow the tips given on the recommendations page.
  • I found a lost animal. Can I give it to a rescue?
    See the recommendation page this could be someones pets, and giving it to a rescue or another person will decrease the chances of reuniting with their family. What would you want done if this was your animal that got out and a good Samaritan found it?
  • I found a dog!! Can I keep it or give it to a friend?
    A found dog is not immediately your property. Most cities and municipalities in Texas require consistent, visible efforts to find the owner - from a few days to two weeks or more - before a finder can claim ownership. When a companion animal is found it is recommended to Check for tags or a collar with the owner’s contact information. If either are available, call immediately! Have the animal checked for a microchip. Any vet or shelter will scan free of charge. Occasionally contact information is not current. There are resources such as microchiphelp.weebly.com who can research an unknown microchip and attempt to find the owner's contact information at no charge. Notify the shelter in the city where the animal was found. Check the city’s social media for animals which match the one you found. Time permitting, contact surrounding city shelters as well. Larger dogs can cover more territory; if an owner is on a city boundary the animal could easily cross from one city to the next. Post on social media. Nextdoor.com, pawboost.com and local area lost / found facebook groups Post flyers in the area where found. Not everyone is on social media; neighbors can help pass the word based on the flyers and help locate the owner. Most small dogs are typically only a block or two from home. In each of these communications it is critical to provide a description of the animal, pictures, cross streets and city where found and the date / time when found. If you are notified by someone claiming to be the owner, verify proof of ownership through vet records (most have photos), a distinguishing mark or characteristic of the animal only the owner would know. Highly desirable dogs can be targeted by people of ill intent.
  • What do I do if I have lost my dog or my dog has escaped?
    Take a deep breath. While it is urgent to find your furbaby, a clear head will allow you to focus on the steps necessary to quickly get the word out and your baby home safely. Put the animal’s blanket, bed, water and food on your porch. In addition, put some of YOUR recently worn clothes or sheets with their bedding. This provides a scent trail to assist in finding their way home. Notify your microchip company your animal has gone missing and update your contact information. They will flag your account for inquiries. Do a quick search of the neighborhood if your pet has escaped your yard. Contact your local shelter, and shelters in surrounding communities. Most will have a public social media site for lost and found animals. Post out on social media. Nextdoor.com, pawboost.com and local area lost / found facebook groups are key to spreading the word quickly. Post flyers in your neighborhood. One of your neighbors may have found your pet and is keeping them safe, but may not know it is your furbaby who they found. Notify vets and groomers in and around your neighborhood. Additional eyes to look out for your missing pet are always a great help. In each of your postings and flyers it is critical to provide a description of the animal, pictures, cross streets / city where lost (along with the date / time) and your contact information.
  • I lost my foster dog, what do I do?"
    Immediately contact the foster team. Immediately contact the medical team. Immediately contact Patt Dawson. KEEP LINE OF SIGHT DO NOT CHASE. If the dog comes to you, call and retrieve. Post on Next Door, Neighbors APP, and Facebook,lost dog sites on facebook and Notify neighborhood associations. Get Flyers Out Everywhere - schools, crossing guards, intersections, neighborhoods, parks, walking trails. Visit this link. Neighbors by Ring (PHONE APP) Check in with shelters daily email them lost posters Leave out food, familiar bed or blanket leave gate open in case they return Remember the power of social media! Utilize the power of the INTERNET to POST on SOCIAL MEDIA, Facebook page, Facebook lost and Found Sites, and your local NextDoor website and the neighbors app and ask friends to share the posts, too. DO NOT DELAY CONTACT THE RESCUE IMMEDIATELY! REMINDER IT MAY TAKE TIME BE PATIENT, DO NOT GIVE UP HOPE!
  • How do I get my dogs to go potty outside?
    This is a very individual process. If a dog has an aversion to going outside and subsequently going outside to potty we need to identify the source of the discomfort. Is it the leash? Is it the new environment? Is it a dog that has a history of neglect and lack of socialization? Are there other dogs that are intimidating the dog in the backyard? With any of these we have to have patience and develop neutral to positive associations to going outside. Some tips are: Treat trails leading to the backyard (the higher value the better) Having Helper dogs teach the new dog Making sure resident dogs are not being to overwhelming when outside or distracting Setting up exercises to slowly acclimate and desensitize to a leash and working up to leash walking outside Provide snuffling and nosework when outside to give the dog a way to process through fear Go outside with your dog Provide reinforcement when outside with varying reinforcement depending on what the dog finds reinforcing (treats, affection, verbal praise, toys) Build on duration. Make going outside as short, brief and positive as possible and work into longer outside times and for some dogs they need longer outside times. Always mark potty with verbal cues, marker and reinforcement (Potty, Yes and then reinforcement delivery). Don't use any harshness when helping a dog go outside to potty, even if you feel frustrated, they can easily feed off your energy
  • CURRENTLY THEY GO OUTSIDE PLAY AND COME IN A POTTY IN THE HOUSE?
    Potty Training 101: Control the environment. If your dog is pottying inside then they are not ready to have much free time all over the house. Crates, Xpens and baby gates are excellent ways to teach a dog we don't go potty where we live. Consistency and frequent outside times is crucial here. Your pattern should be outside, crate, outside, crate until a healthy potty routine is established. This is a stage and process, the long term goal is to have your dog control their bathroom habits without needing environmental management. But we use the phase of controlling the environment and the phrase "less freedom is more loving" in learning good potty habits. Once your dog is offering reliable potty time outside over a period of time we can give them more freedom inside to integrate bathroom control into more space.
  • WHEN THERE ARE LOUD NOISES OR DISTRACTORS IN THE YARD HOW DO WE PREVENT THEM FROM REDIRECTING ON EACH OTHER?
    This is best managed by practicing positive reinforcement basics when you do not need them, so when you do, the dogs are able to have conditioned behavior (leave it, lets go, come, look, etc) replace impulsive ones (overarousal, redirection and impulse). Practice, practice, practice in controlled environments. Add duration, distractions and distance and then generalize to new environments. There is nothing about the basics. And having you and your dog speak the same language will allow for you to "matter" when the environment is loud, distracting, and/or stressful.
  • What do I do when my puppies are crying? How do I get them to stop crying?
    Let them have time to accumulate your instinct is to pick them up and hold which remember most have never been touched by humans before this is scary and overwhelming give them time to adjust. Remember they may now be separated from their mom and other siblings they need to release, they are safe and will need to adjust to their new normal. TIME AND PATIENCE.
  • I GIVE THE PUPPY A LOT OF ATTENTION WHY IS SHE STILL CRYING?
    Has the puppy gone potty in the last hour-2 hours (time depends on age)? Has the puppy had physical and mental enrichment in the past 2 hours? (Chewing, playing, walking, basic positive reinforcement training) Has the puppy eaten on their regular schedule? Does the puppy have contact reassurance/affection time? (Snuggle, littermates, cuddle time with you? Have you established a puppy routine and it is structured? Always use the when/then rule- when a puppy goes into an X-pen, crate, etc then he gets a long lasting enrichment. Have you added a cover/white noise to the crate? (Some pups prefer fans, music, TV, part or all of their crate covered) Have you figured out proper placement of the crate for this particular puppy? Make sure you do not speak, pet, acknowledge or let a puppy/dog out of their kennel if they are crying. Timing is crucial for them to learn impulse control and not barking gets reinforcement rather than the other way around. Remember negative attention is still attention. Always ignore them until the crying is stopped. You can put quite on a verbal cue. When your pup is finally quiet, say, "Hush, yes!" and treat. Your puppy may be overstimulated by the environment. Eliminate visual and auditory business around the house.
  • HOW DO I GET MY PUPPY NOT TO BITE?
    A puppy developing bite inhibition is a developmental appropriate stage. We have to understand that puppies need to chew, bite and use their mouths. We can help satisfy their natural need to experience the world through their teeth and mouth by giving a high pitched yelp when their bite pressure is too hard and immediately replace your hand/skin with a toy, Kong (frozen ahead of time with peanut butter/yogurt/canned dog food/pumpkin or dehydrated food stuffed inside), snuffle mat, enrichment or rawhide free bone. Always ask yourself if your puppy needs more or less mental stimulation- canines can bite when they are bored with pent up energy (in this case they need to work more) or when the environment is overly exciting (in this case- regulate the impulse to bite by positive crate training).
  • HOW DO I GET MY PUPPY OR DOG TO STOP JUMPING?
    Never greet, give affection or attention to a dog that has their paws off the floor. Be mindful of your own energy level and behaviors when jumping is likely to occur. Identify the situations that cause your dog to jump. Once you have noted when they are likely to jump you have options- you can leash your dog and cue a sit as a new default behavior, you can establish fluency with place work, you can do nosework and find it games as a replacement behavior and reward system to all four on the floor, you can teach your dog touch as a way to greet guests, you can positively crate for the first 20-30 minutes and then when your dog is calm let them out to greet with a more appropriate energy level, you can use the when/then rule *when* your dog is likely to jump, *then* we are going to pair that situation with long lasting tasks (redirecting jumping energy into a long lasting high value enrichment). Many clients find combined approaches to be most effective with jumping. Essentially, always teach a dog a calm mind state, replacement behavior, set up the environment to reduce jumping in the first place, always reward and teach the off cue and above all never reinforce with your attention, affection or excitement a jumping dog.
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DON’T FORGET! As soon as you receive your CODE from the Dallas Dog Adoption Team, register and set your first appointment. Once you get your code and your account is active, it is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED to schedule your first appointment as the 4-week session begins the moment you activate your account!  We would hate for you to miss any opportunities from this AMAZING DEAL!!   If you would like more information or would like to take advantage of this opportunity please email adopt@dallasdogrrr.org and ask for information on the Good Pup Training Program.